Florida Felony and Misdemeanor | Statute of Limitations | Theft and other Charges

Florida Criminal Statute of Limitations

“Time starts to run on the day after the offense is committed.”
Statute of Limitations

Frequently Asked Questions


How long can prosecutors wait to go forward on a criminal case?

What is the Statute of Limitations for criminal cases in Florida? 

The Florida Criminal Statute of Limitations, Theft, Drug and general Felony Statutes of Limitations sometimes depends on the nature of the criminal charges. Under Florida law:

  • Second degree misdemeanor must commence within one (1) year of the alleged incident;
  • First degree misdemeanor has two (2) years to commence prosecution;
  • First Degree (1st) felonies are 4 years; and
  • All other felonies (2nd and 3rd Degree) are 3 years.

The Statute provides, in part:

775.15 Time limitations; general time limitations; exceptions.—

(1)A prosecution for a capital felony, a life felony, or a felony that resulted in a death may be commenced at any time. If the death penalty is held to be unconstitutional by the Florida Supreme Court or the United States Supreme Court, all crimes designated as capital felonies shall be considered life felonies for the purposes of this section, and prosecution for such crimes may be commenced at any time.
(2)Except as otherwise provided in this section, prosecutions for other offenses are subject to the following periods of limitation:

(a)A prosecution for a felony of the first degree must be commenced within 4 years after it is committed.


(b)A prosecution for any other felony must be commenced within 3 years after it is committed.

(c)A prosecution for a misdemeanor of the first degree must be commenced within 2 years after it is committed.

(d)A prosecution for a misdemeanor of the second degree or a noncriminal violation must be commenced within 1 year after it is committed.

(3)An offense is committed either when every element has occurred or, if a legislative purpose to prohibit a continuing course of conduct plainly appears, at the time when the course of conduct or the defendant’s complicity therein is terminated. Time starts to run on the day after the offense is committed.

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BATT1000 BATTERY (TOUCH OR STRIKE)

“Actually and intentionally touches or strikes 
another person against the will of the other”

 

Battery Misdemeanor, BATT1000, BATTERY (TOUCH OR STRIKE)

Battery Misdemeanor, BATT1000, BATTERY (TOUCH OR STRIKE)

Battery Misdemeanor

Battery Misdemeanor

 


Battery is Number 14 on our list of criminal charges that are used to justify an arrest in Tampa’s Hillsborough County, Florida. We reviewed the top criminal charges included in the Hillsborough County Jail records. We narrowed the list down to the top 50 ways to end up in jail and have shared them here.

If the charge involves domestic relationships, then you can be charged with Domestic Violence Battery. That is the 6th most popular way to get arrested on the west coast of Florida.


If you have been charged with BATT1000 BATTERY (TOUCH OR STRIKE) you can call a Tampa Criminal Defense Attorney at 813-222-2220 to Fight for You.


 

Form Code: BATT1000


Florida Statute: 784.03.1AB
Level: Misd (Misdemeanor)
Degree: 1st
Description: BATTERY (TOUCH OR STRIKE)

BATT1000 BATTERY (TOUCH OR STRIKE) one of the most commonly charged offenses in Hillsborough County, Florida.

Chapter 784 ASSAULT; BATTERY; CULPABLE NEGLIGENCE

“conviction means a determination of guilt . . . regardless of whether adjudication is withheld”

784.03 Battery; felony battery.


(1)(a) The offense of battery occurs when a person:

1. Actually and intentionally touches or strikes another person against the will of the other; or


2. Intentionally causes bodily harm to another person.

(b) Except as provided in subsection (2), a person who commits battery commits a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.


“second or subsequent battery commits a 

felony of the third degree”

(2) A person who has one prior conviction for battery, aggravated battery, or felony battery and who commits any second or subsequent battery commits a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084. For purposes of this subsection, “conviction” means a determination of guilt that is the result of a plea or a trial, regardless of whether adjudication is withheld or a plea of nolo contendere is entered.

THEF1010 PETIT THEFT 1st – Misdemeanor Petit Theft

Misdemeanor Petit Theft

 

Petit Theft is one of the most commonly charged offenses in Florida.  If someone has no prior record, a conviction can be avoided and a Motion to Seal the records can keep this mistake from permanently hurting lives.

 

Misdemeanor Petit Theft

Misdemeanor Petit Theft

Petit Theft

If you have been charged with THEF1010 PETIT THEFT 1st you can call a  Defense Attorney  in Tampa to Fight for You or a friend.


Form Code: THEF1010


Florida Statute: 812.014.2E
Level: Misd (Misdemeanor)
Degree: 1st
Description: PETIT THEFT 1st

THEF1010 PETIT THEFT 1st is one of the most commonly charged offenses in Hillsborough County, Florida.

 

“obtains or uses, or endeavors to obtain or to use, the property of another”

Chapter 812 THEFT, ROBBERY, AND RELATED CRIMES812.014 Theft.(1) A person commits theft if he or she knowingly obtains or uses, or endeavors to obtain or to use, the property of another with intent to, either temporarily or permanently:(a) Deprive the other person of a right to the property or a benefit from the property.(b) Appropriate the property to his or her own use or to the use of any person not entitled to the use of the property.

It is grand theft of the third degree and a felony of the third degree
. . . if the property stolen is . . . Valued at $300 or more, but less than $5,000
(2)(a) 1. If the property stolen is valued at $100,000 or more or is a semitrailer that was deployed by a law enforcement officer; or
2. If the property stolen is cargo valued at $50,000 or more that has entered the stream of interstate or intrastate commerce from the shipper’s loading platform to the consignee’s receiving dock;
or
3. If the offender commits any grand theft and:a. In the course of committing the offense the offender uses a motor vehicle as an instrumentality, other than merely as a getaway vehicle, to assist in committing the offense and thereby damages the real property of another; orb. In the course of committing the offense the offender causes damage to the real or personal property of another in excess of $1,000, the offender commits grand theft in the first degree, punishable as a felony of the first degree, as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084.(b) 1. If the property stolen is valued at $20,000 or more, but less than $100,000;2. The property stolen is cargo valued at less than $50,000 that has entered the stream of interstate or intrastate commerce from the shipper’s loading platform to the consignee’s receiving dock;3. The property stolen is emergency medical equipment, valued at $300 or more, that is taken from a facility licensed under chapter 395 or from an aircraft or vehicle permitted under chapter 401; or4. The property stolen is law enforcement equipment, valued at $300 or more, that is taken from an authorized emergency vehicle, as defined in s. 316.003, the offender commits grand theft in the second degree, punishable as a felony of the second degree, as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084. Emergency medical equipment means mechanical or electronic apparatus used to provide emergency services and care as defined in s. 395.002(9) or to treat medical emergencies. Law enforcement equipment means any property, device, or apparatus used by any law enforcement officer as defined in s. 943.10 in the officer’s official business.
However, if the property is stolen within a county that is subject to a state of emergency declared by the Governor under chapter 252, the theft is committed after the declaration of emergency is made, and the perpetration of the theft is facilitated by conditions arising from the emergency, the theft is a felony of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084. As used in this paragraph, the term “conditions arising from the emergency” means civil unrest, power outages, curfews, voluntary or mandatory evacuations, or a reduction in the presence of or response time for first responders or homeland security personnel.
For purposes of sentencing under chapter 921, a felony offense that is reclassified under this paragraph is ranked one level above the ranking under s. 921.0022 or s. 921.0023 of the offense committed.(c) It is grand theft of the third degree and a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084, if the property stolen is:1. Valued at $300 or more, but less than $5,000.2. Valued at $5,000 or more, but less than $10,000.3. Valued at $10,000 or more, but less than $20,000.
4. A will, codicil, or other testamentary instrument.5. A firearm.6. A motor vehicle, except as provided in paragraph (a).7. Any commercially farmed animal, including any animal of the equine, bovine, or swine class, or other grazing animal, and including aquaculture species raised at a certified aquaculture facility. If the property stolen is aquaculture species raised at a certified aquaculture facility, then a $10,000 fine shall be imposed.8. Any fire extinguisher.9. Any amount of citrus fruit consisting of 2,000 or more individual pieces of fruit.10. Taken from a designated construction site identified by the posting of a sign as provided for in s. 810.09(2)(d).11. Any stop sign.12. Anhydrous ammonia.However, if the property is stolen within a county that is subject to a state of emergency declared by the Governor under chapter 252, the property is stolen after the declaration of emergency is made, and the perpetration of the theft is facilitated by conditions arising from the emergency, the offender commits a felony of the second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084, if the property is valued at $5,000 or more, but less than $10,000, as provided under subparagraph 2., or if the property is valued at $10,000 or more, but less than $20,000, as provided under subparagraph 3. As used in this paragraph, the term “conditions arising from the emergency” means civil unrest, power outages, curfews, voluntary or mandatory evacuations, or a reduction in the presence of or the response time for first responders or homeland security personnel. For purposes of sentencing under chapter 921, a felony offense that is reclassified under this paragraph is ranked one level above the ranking under s. 921.0022 or s. 921.0023 of the offense committed.(d) It is grand theft of the third degree and a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084, if the property stolen is valued at $100 or more, but less than $300, and is taken from a dwelling as defined in s. 810.011(2) or from the unenclosed curtilage of a dwelling pursuant to s. 810.09(1).(e) Except as provided in paragraph (d), if the property stolen is valued at $100 or more, but less than $300, the offender commits petit theft of the first degree, punishable as a misdemeanor of the first degree, as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.

Deportation of Cuban Nationals From United States

Cuba, Deportation, lawful permanent resident, ICE, LPR
Deportation of Cuban Nationals

Deportation of Cuban Nationals From the United States remains an open question for Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys in United States District Courts. One source says, “At this point we do not know how/when the normalization will impact the U.S.’s ability to deport Cuban individuals.  At any rate, those who are in lawful status and not subject to any grounds of deportation (i.e. those who entered, obtained lawful permanent resident status, and do not have crimes that make them deportable) do not need to worry.  The main impact will be on those who either fell out of status and can’t fix their status now (for example, those who were paroled in and then never applied for lawful permanent resident status, and who are not eligible for LPR status due to crimes) and those who already have deportation orders but were released from ICE custody on ICE orders of supervision because they could not be physically deported.”

UPDATE – Deportation of Cuban Nationals


“The notice includes a warning: 

If you do not appear at a hearing, 
you may be ordered deported in your absence.”


 

Notice of Hearing, Cuba, Deportation, ICE, lawful permanent resident, LPR
Sample Notice of Hearing

There is at least one case where the deportation proceedings of a Cuban national was reset to 2019, almost four years after the initial notice from the Immigration Court. A sample Notice of Hearing is included in this article. The notice includes a warning that “If you do not appear at a hearing, you may be ordered deported in your absence.”

Furthermore the source advises, “At this point, I think it’s important to advise Cuban clients that deportation may be a reality soon and that they should be careful to avoid criminal activity and pleading to offenses that will bring them to ICE’s attention/subject them to criminal grounds of deportation.  Basically, after years of not having to face full immigration consequences (physical deportation) of criminal convictions, they will now have to seriously consider those consequences.”
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Debra LaFave – Probation Early Termination Approved by Florida Supreme Court

The too-pretty-for-prison teacher, Debra LaFave was released from probation early by today’s ruling in the Florida Supreme Court. The Court ruled that the state attorney could not appeal the trial court’s order terminating the probation, even though the no prison plea agreement provided that her probation was not to be terminated early.
The Florida Supreme Court said:

Early Termination of Probation

“Six years into her ten-year nonprison sentence, LaFave unabashedly sought early termination of her probation in 2011 in direct violation of her plea agreement. She asked the circuit court to terminate her sex offender probation four years early. On October 3, 2011, over objections from both the state attorney and the Department of Corrections [(DOC)], the circuit court granted her motion and terminated her probation as requested. “
“We answer the certified question in the negative and find that the State did not have the right to petition the district court [to appeal the decision] for certiorari review in this case.”
Complete Decision Here:

History of Cell Phone Searches

Cell Phone Search Warrant

Cell Phone Search Warrant, Cell Phone Search, Search and Seizure

Search Warrant
Cell Phone

Cell Phone Search Warrant


Up until quite recently, there were exceptions to the general requirement that police get a Search Warrant for a cell phone. Cell phones have been a window into suspects’ activities, as police used these exceptions to get their hands on information found inside mobile devices. Obtaining a Search Warrant for a cell phone is not that hard to do. You can review a Search Warrant for a Cell Phone here:  Here is an actual iPhone Search Warrant . GPS or Global Positioning Satellite information found in mobile phones has also been used by police.


Up until around 2014, police could and did search digital information on a cell phone seized from an individual who was arrested. Defense Attorneys would frequently challenge such searches. These searches were frequently based upon “helping” arrested citizens by making sure their property was properly inventoried by the arresting officers for safekeeping by jail personnel or by the evidence unit at the arresting agency’s office. This rationale remains a frequent flier in broad invasive “inventory” searches of automobiles during traffic stops.


Cell Phone Search, Search and Seizure, Search Warrant


Cell Phone Search, Search and Seizure, Search Warrant

Cell Phone Search Warrant

Warrant Required
Mobile Devices
Florida had outlawed warrantless phone searches before the US Supreme Court. That ruling is discussed here. Now prohibited will be mobile device and cell phone searches without a warrant. Before the 2014 United States Supreme Court ruling here was another Court’s Ruling on a Cell Phone Search. Searches Incident to a lawful arrest were previously justified by cops using issues of police officer safety and prevention of destruction of evidence.
Now under Floridalaw, a Motion to Suppress Evidence can be filed pursuant to Rule 3.190(h), Florida Rules of Criminal Procedure. Illegal Search and seizure now applies to cell phones and the Courts may exclude illegally obtained evidence including, photographs, video, text messages, directory and location data, voice mails, and emails.

Case Summary: The US Supreme Court’s ruling is that a properly obtained and issued search warrant is generally required before search of a cell phone. Here is some language from the Court’s ruling.

“Cell phones differ in both a quantitative and a qualitative sense from other objects that might be kept on an arrestee’s person. The term “cell phone” is itself misleading shorthand; many of these devices are in fact minicomputers that also happen to have the capacity to be used as a telephone. They could just as easily be called cameras,video players, rolodexes, calendars, tape recorders, libraries, diaries, albums, televisions, maps, or newspapers.”
“The sum of an individual’s private life can be reconstructed through a thousand photographs labeledwith dates, locations, and descriptions; the same cannot besaid of a photograph or two of loved ones tucked into a wallet.”
“To further complicate the scope of the privacy interests at stake, the data a user views on many modern cell phones may not in fact be stored on the device itself. Treating a cell phone as a container whose contents may be searched incident to an arrest is a bit strained as an initial matter.”
“[T]he search incident to arrest exception does not apply to cell phones . . . .”

Some Excerpts from Florida Cell Phone Search Cases:


“However, we express great concern in permitting the officer to search appellant’s cell phone here where there was no indication the officer had reason to believe the cell phone contained evidence.”
“We are equally concerned that giving officers unbridled discretion to rummage through at will the entire contents of one’s cell phone, even where there is no basis for believing evidence of the crime of arrest will be found on the phone, creates a serious and recurring threat to the privacy of countless individuals.”

 

What is Entrapment?

What is Entrapment?
Sometimes law enforcement behavior can be so despicable that their conduct and method of investigation leads only to entrapped citizens. This form of entrapment is rare but not unheard of.

What is Entrapment?


Entrapment occurs when criminal conduct is a product of law enforcement officials. In other words, a police officer can’t lure an innocent person to commit a crime then arrest them for it. When cops cross this boundary the defense of entrapment is available.


Florida Laws on Entrapment


Florida recognizes two theories of defense based on entrapment: subjective and objective entrapment. See 777.201, Florida Statutes; Munoz v. State, 629 So. 2d 90, 99 (Fla. 1993). Subjective entrapment focuses on whether conduct by law enforcement induced, encouraged, or caused the defendant to commit a crime when he or she was not predisposed to do so. See § 777.201, Fla. Stat.; Jones v. State, 114 So. 3d 1123, 1126 (Fla. 1st DCA 2013).


Subjective Entrapment


The test to establish a subjective entrapment defense includes:

1. whether a government agent induced the defendant to commit the crime charged;

Inducement has been defined as “any government conduct creating a substantial risk that an otherwise law-abiding citizen would commit an offense, including persuasion, fraudulent representations, threats, coercive tactics, harassment, promises of reward, or pleas based on need, sympathy or friendship” Farley v. State, 848 So. 2d 393 (Fla. 4th DCA 2003).

2. whether the defendant was predisposed to commit the crime charged;

Predisposition asks whether the accused was awaiting any propitious opportunity or was ready and willing, without persuasion, to commit the offense. Munoz, 629 So. 2d at 99. Predisposition is not present when one has no prior criminal history related to the offense at issue. Nadeau v. State, 683 So. 2d 504, 506 (Fla. 4th DCA 1995).

(3) whether the entrapment defense should be evaluated by the jury.

Where the facts and the law establish entrapment there is no need for the jury to make any findings of fact. Where facts are contested though the issue of entrapment will be decided by a jury.


Objective Entrapment


Objective entrapment occurs when egregious law enforcement conduct amounts to a violation of the defendant’s right to due process under article I, section 9, of the Florida Constitution. See Munoz, 629 So. 2d at 99.

Simply put, law enforcement behavior can be so despicable that their conduct and method of investigation leads only to entrapped citizens. This form of entrapment is rare but not unheard of.

Thanks to Guest Author Robson Powers of the Law Office of Michael P. Maddux, P.A.

 

Gasparilla Arrest Update : 42 Busted

Gasparilla Arrest Update

Gasparilla Arrest Update

Gasparilla Arrest Update
42 Busted
Gasparilla Arrest Update: “authorities announce a preliminary tally of arrests made throughout the day: 3 felony arrests and 39 misdemeanor arrests, including 12 for underage drinking. Sixty-three open-container citations are issued.”

Source TPD and Media Report

Pasco Oxycodone Defense Attorney – 813-222-2220 – Video on YouTube

Pasco Oxycodone Defense Attorney

Pasco Oxycodone Defense Attorney


Pasco Oxycodone Defense Attorney has a FREE fully searchable Pasco Drug Crimes Oxycodone defense database on Oxycontin and drug charges in Florida. Drug Crimes Data Base Click Here. This video discusses and Compares How to use probable cause in criminal cases and the possibility of drug charges being dropped or dismissed when police improperly search for and then seize contraband. Casey reviews the Minimum Mandatory sentences that may apply to some Drug Trafficking cases. W.F. “Casey” Ebsary, Jr. is a Board Certified Criminal Trial Attorney, a specialist who defends drug crimes in Pasco County, Florida.


Transcript: [Pasco Oxycodone Defense Attorney Narrates] Hundreds of people are arrested every day. You may be one of them. I spend most of my time defending cases in State and Federal Courts. Many times drug crimes arise from searches of motor vehicles. Sometimes police will stop a car and then search it. Sometimes we are able to attack these searches when police do not have reasonable suspicion or probable cause to search the motor vehicle. In the event we can suppress the evidence, we may be able to have the drug charges dismissed, since there is no longer any evidence to be admitted against you in a criminal prosecution and evidence becomes unavailable for admission in a trial. I have arrived at my destination – one of the many courthouses in Tampa Bay where I help people. Let me help you. Criminal charges in State or federal Court? Let me help. Call me at 813-222-2220. Let me drive to court to help you.[End of Pasco Oxycontin Defense Lawyer Narration]

Polk Marijuana Defense Attorney 813-222-2220 – Drug Crimes – Cannabis

Polk County Marijuana Law

Polk County Marijuana Law


Drug2Go.com and Polk Marijuana Defense Attorney now have a FREE fully searchable Polk Drug Crimes Cannabis Marijuana defense database on marijuana and drug charges in Florida. This video discusses and Compares How to use probable cause in criminal cases and the possibility of drug charges being dropped or dismissed when police illegally improperly search for and then seize contraband without a Search Warrant. Casey reviews the Minimum Mandatory sentences that may apply to some Marijuana and Cannabis Drug Trafficking cases. W.F. “Casey” Ebsary, Jr. is a Board Certified Criminal Trial Attorney, a specialist who defends drug crimes in Polk County, Florida.

 


Transcript: [Polk Marijuana Defense Attorney Narrates] Hundreds of people are arrested every day. You may be one of them. I spend most of my time defending cases in State and Federal Courts. Many times drug crimes arise from searches of motor vehicles. Sometimes police will stop a car and then search it. Sometimes we are able to attack these searches when police do not have reasonable suspicion or probable cause to search the motor vehicle. In the event we can suppress the evidence, we may be able to have the drug charges dismissed, since there is no longer any evidence to be admitted against you in a criminal prosecution and evidence becomes unavailable for admission in a trial. I have arrived at my destination – one of the many courthouses in Tampa Bay where I help people. Let me help you. Criminal charges in State or federal Court? Let me help. Call me at 813-222-2220. Let me drive to court to help you.[End of Polk Cannabis Defense Lawyer Narration]

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Board Certified Criminal Trial Lawyer